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Memphis Moments

Big Orange Gala

Canoes + Cocktails

Chicken and Beer Festival

 

Dog Days

Feast on the Farm

Komen Luncheon


Stories and Photos by Virginia M. Davis, Emily Adams Keplinger and Gaye Swan.

 
 

Big Orange Gala

Scholarship Fundraiser

Knoxville campus leaders Chancellor Donde Ploughman, Director of Athletics Phillip Fulmer, Men’s Basketball Coach Rick Barnes, and Associate Vice Chancellor for Alumni Affairs Lee Patouillet, were joined by UT alumni, friends and family for the fourth annual Big Orange Gala at Memphis Botanic Garden. Guests attended the event for a chance to relive some of their college days while mingling with fellow Volunteers. The event, hosted by the Memphis UT Knoxville Alumni Chapter, served as a fundraiser for scholarships for students from Shelby County and West Tennessee. The evening included dinner and entertainment by the Nick Black Band. Fulmer told the crowd that the culture of the university was changing and that great days were in store for the University of Tennessee. Attendees were asked to “join the journey” by being a voice for the university, sharing their UT stories and showing their colors by wearing orange on designated days called “Big Orange Fridays.”

 

 
 

Canoes + Cocktails

Fun on the Water

Guests of Canoes & Cocktails paddled a small fleet around Hyde Lake in Shelby Farms Park, enjoying a guided tour and pleasant weather. “There’s no better place to enjoy a beautiful sunset than right here on the lake,” said Angie Whitfield, Shelby Farms Park Marketing and Communications Manager. “Our paddlers had a great time enjoying the best view in town, and they also supported a good cause. All proceeds from Canoes + Cocktails benefit Shelby Farms Park Conservancy and help keep the park clean, green, and safe.” The leisurely tour lasted about an hour and ended with a delightful happy hour on the AutoZone Front Porch, complete with outdoor games and live music. The signature drink for the evening was Paddle Punch, a tropical cocktail provided by Old Dominick. Lynnie’s Links and Drinks food truck was also on hand for tasty treats. The event was sponsored by Pinnacle Bank.

     
 

Chicken and Beer Festival

Food, Music and Fun on the Field

More than 3900 hungry and thirsty Memphians descended onto the field of Liberty Bowl Stadium for the second annual Memphis Chicken and Beer Festival. It was a perfect sunny afternoon for the festivities as guests enjoyed live music from Chris Hill, Kevin and Bethany Paige, and The Marcus Malone Band. Southern Hands cooked up its famous grilled and baked chicken along with fresh green beans, cornbread and dressing with gravy. Characters dished out smoked turkey legs and TrapFusion served up delicious smoked wings and chicken sausage. Laura’s Kitchen was also on hand with its mouth-watering selection of southern favorites. All guests received a complimentary glass to sample the hundreds of ice-cold beers from Sam Adams, Pabst Blue Ribbon, Shiner, Leinenkugel, Schlafly, Murphy’s, Red Stripe and Guinness. For those thirsty for other beverages, there were choices from Seagrams, White Claw, Clubtails, Jack Daniel’s and Bulleit. Proceeds went to benefit Dorothy Day House.

     
 

Dog Days

National Ornamental Metal Museum

Canines and their human companions enjoyed a day of fun as the National Ornamental Metal Museum hosted its Dog Days of Summer event. From the tiniest (and youngest) pup, an 8-week old Golden Doodle, to the largest, a Great Pyrenees, there were pooches of all shapes and sizes romping about the museum’s grounds. Water stations and wading pools kept everyone hydrated and provided a playful way to beat the summer heat. Hollywood Feed, MEMPopS, TopDawgz and Stanley’s Sweet Street Treats were onsite with treats for dogs and humans alike. Guests had the opportunity to make keepsake paw print castings in the Foundry. They could also customize their own stamped-copper dog tags. ALIVE Rescue Memphis also joined the outing by bringing cuddly canines, available for adoption, in hopes of finding their “fur-ever” homes.

 

Feast on the Farm

Agricenter Fundraiser

The sturdy wooden chicken coop awaited four healthy hens, but they were no-shows. Made by Amish craftsmen, the donated coop stood among other auction offerings at Feast on the Farm, a casual summery fundraiser at Agricenter International. Other choices for eager bidders included packages such as a fly-fishing trip on the Pecos River and a Kentucky quail hunt. Estimated at a $1,530 value, the fully equipped coop along with four cluckers fetched a $2,100 high bid. The gift will help to enable youngsters to experience the wonder of tending things that live and grow. Gifts, donations and sponsorships for the annual event contributed to the mission of Agricenter International, now in its 40th year — to advance knowledge and understanding of agriculture. Proceeds from Feast on the Farm go to Agricenter’s education programs for children. Major sponsors included Helena Agri-Enterprises and H. Saga Port Alliance. More than 30 local providers and volunteers donated foods, beverages and services..

 

Komen Luncheon

More Than Pink

The Grand Tennessee Ballroom of the Memphis Hilton filled with guests wearing the signature color of breast cancer awareness as survivors and those living with MBC (Metastatic Breast Cancer) were joined by family and friends for the 2019 More Than Pink Susan G. Komen Memphis-MidSouth Mississippi Luncheon. WREG anchor Jonee Lewis served as the event’s emcee and Jennifer Winstead was the 2019 Honorary Chair. Guest speakers included Dr. Jennifer Boals from Methodist, Alice Darden from International Paper, Dr. Philip Lammers from Baptist and Pat Godfrey McRee, the founding director of Memphis’ new support group for those with MBC called Hope Up. “Since 1993 Komen Memphis-MidSouth Mississippi has provided over $11.2 million in community grants,” explained Elaine Hare, Executive Director of the local Komen affiliate. “The more we raise, the more we grant, the more lives saved, with 25 percent of net proceeds funding national research and the remaining 75 percent staying here in our local community.”